Donomark

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Everything posted by Donomark

  1. Detective Comics #1006: There was a real 90s feel to this issue. Kyle Holtz has a very Kelly Jones-esque style to his art, and Tomasi's writing was a bit looser. His Batman sounded like something out of the 80s, but I dug it. Simple story, part one of who knows how many, but I liked it more than the last few issues. Batman Beyond #33 (2019): Really good issue. This is a story that could've been in the original animated series had it gone on long enough. Action Comics #1012: I'm fading out of this storyline. It's too involved for me to keep hold, and I really do not like Simon Kudranski's artwork. Amazing Spider-Man #825: Awesome issue. I love how Spencer uses Mysterio as a psuedo tie-in to the upcoming movie, but he is only a means to an end. Brilliant. Single Issues: 211 Trade Paperbacks: 7
  2. I wish I could write a Spider-Man comic book when I was 21. I empathize with the kid's fanboyism, aside from that IDC.
  3. Rocketman: A much more entertaining and comparatively pleasant biopic about a flamboyant performer, Taron Egerton delivers a terrifically energetic performance. A lot of fun, I'd see it again.
  4. Teen Titans #31 (2019): A big fight issue with Lobo, but one done well. I forget how overwhelming powerful Lobo is, and he's a total bastard in this. Taking a bounty for his own daughter. Solid first part to a two parter. Batman #73 (2019): Pretentious comic book is pretentious. Nightwing #61 (2019): This was a good issue with solid writing and art, but it promised to be the conclusion of the story, and Dick's still "Ric". WTH?! James Bond: 007 #8: Great issue! Miles Morales: Spider-Man #7: Okay issue. I wasn't loving the two extra artists though. And IDK why Miles would even think of going near Uncle Aaron again after everything that guy has done. Single Issues: 207 Trade Paperbacks: 7
  5. I'm of the opinion that the first X-Men film is the best, so I'm down.
  6. Star Trek III: The Search for Spock A solid follow-up that picks up immediately after the last one left off with zero time skipped. Like with Wrath of Khan, the plot feels lesser than it is. Both films have a plot, but they almost feel invisible to the character conflicts. Not a criticism, just an observation. Shatner gave another solid performance full of emotion, and the support players had way more to do than I've seen them in probably ever. This made the movie really heartfelt, with the theme of friendship making all of the crazy BS worthwhile. The ending got me, not gonna lie. The new actress for Saviuk wasn't terrific, but she was way more Vulcan-like than Kirstie Alley, so I liked her better.
  7. Silver Surfer: Black #1: The writing was okay but the art was super cool Spider-Man: Life Story #4: I've loved every issue of this mini and #4 was no exception, especially as a fan of the Clone Saga. THIS SERIES MAN Single Issues: 202 Trade Paperbacks: 7
  8. Superman #12 (2019): Okay Wonder Twins #5: Good Batman and the Outsiders #2 (2019): I don't really see the interest in all these new characters when reader of this book come for the four mains. This issue read like the distracted boyfriend meme. Amazing Spider-Man #824: Not much happens in this issue until the shock ending, but the writing was so good it didn't matter. I want Spencer to have a Slott-length run on this title, it feels so right. I will say I'm not big on Ryan Ottley's artwork. It's too cartoony to take totally serious, and this is a dark sequel to Kraven's Last Hunt. It was a bit distracting. Immortal Hulk #19: OOOOOOMMMMMMMMMMGGGGGGGGGGG Single Issues: 200 Trade Paperbacks: 7
  9. The Invisible Lesbian: by Ocean, then known as Oceanerosemarie, Murielle Magelin and Sandrine Revel. An adaptation of French comedienne Ocean's one-woman show, the story chronicles her life and adulthood as a femme woman struggling to achieve romance with other lesbians. At first she's barely believed to be gay because she isn't butch, then she struggles to find and connect with other women, then she runs the gamut of different relationships. Light, humorous story with nice artwork that only loses points with her most significant relationship ending off-panel and the story finishing at a brick wall more than a screeching halt. It was jarring how abrupt everything simply ended. Interestingly enough, though the story and aforementioned performance are all about the trials and tribulations of a femme gay woman, Ocean last year transitioned to a man. A follow-up performance/comic would be interesting as a continuation to the story told here. Punisher MAX: Happy Ending: One-shot mainly featuring a middle-aged nobody derping into the world of the Punisher. More interesting than it initially seemed. Single Issues: 195 Trade Paperbacks: 7
  10. I don't know...as a single film I don't think so. First of all you have to decide if you're dealing with the Phoenix Force or Jean's untapped power potential. One or the other. Then you have to build up Jean as the Phoenix. Then have her be manipulated by the Hellfire Club or some villain, then do Dark Phoenix, then go cosmic with the Shi'ar Empire. It's a multi-part ongoing story. Maybe a trilogy could've done it, but trying to do it in one film is simply a case of misplaced priorities, like Spider-Man 3.
  11. It does watch better as a one-off. I didn't feel lost not having seen Apocalypse, and dug this as a random X-Men adventure.
  12. Detective Comics #450: "The Cape and Cowl Death-Trap!" This issue from Elliott S! Maggin and Walt Simonson was the basis for the B:TAS episode "The Cape and Cowl Conspiracy", which Maggin returned to script for. The original issue is little more than a short story filled with ads. The basic premise is the same: Batman frightens a fat crook for information, said crook hires Jeremy Wormwood, expert assassin to retrieve Batman's cape and cowl for revenge, Wormwood traps Batman in a Wax Museum, forcing Batman to resign the items. Wormwood returns to the crook and in exchange for the explanation why the guy wants the cape and cowl he gives up the identity of the criminal who hired him to assassinate a judge. Crook turns out to be Batman in disguise, and after a brief scuffle is handed over to Gordon and the police. The animated adaptation is pretty much the exact same, only with logical expansions. Instead of the murder of a judge, Josiah Wormwood stole barrier bonds from a courier. We see Batman kidnap (in front of a room full of people which was pretty cool) Wormwood's previous contact Josek, and Wormwood attempts an initial trap involving a holographic hostage and a train. The comic had 70's Walt Simonson who's artwork is good in spots, and a bit too rough in other spots. The episode has a great performance from Bud Cort, some terrific dialogue and delivery by Kevin Conroy, and cool direction let down only by the limp and slow animation. I like the episode better, but the comic is classic 70s era Detective Comics where Batman's moniker was often "The Dread Batman!"
  13. Dark Phoenix: Really enjoyed it. No way is it near the best of the X-Men movies, but I don't see it close to being the worst either. CONS: Everything with Jessica Chastain sucks. The big events of the film including deaths should've carried a bit more seismic weight. The US turn on the X-Men over what amounts to two police cars getting tossed with little else justifying the mood switch, as the begin the movie loving the X-Men. Storm and Nightcrawler have little to do. But just like I was hoping, this felt like a true X-Men story. I appreciated the smaller stakes, the character-driven angst. MacAvoy stole the show for me as a darker, more manipulative and ego-driven Xavier. I thought Nicholas Hoult was good with what he was given. I liked seeing more of a team dynamic with the X-Men in the middle part of the film. The action sequences all had enough intensity to keep me engaged as well. I recognize I'm a lone voice in the conversation, but I came away from this viewing smiling quite a bit. It's a few drafts away from being a much tighter, stronger movie, but for what I watched I got my money's worth.
  14. Can't say I'm surprised. I do want to ask when this narrative of "Oh, the X-Men movies always sucked" came out. Everyone enjoyed Days of Future Past fine enough, and we had the last two Wolverine movies and the two Deadpool films. Apocalypse may've been bad, but it's weird that people are spitting on this franchise which such relish in a way that doesn't correlate to the history of popular reception. X-Men: Positive X-2: Positive The Last Stand: Negative X-Men Origins: Wolverine: Negative First Class: Positive The Wolverine: Positive Days of Future Past: Positive Deadpool: Positive Apocalypse: Negative Logan: Positive Deadpool 2: Positive Dark Phoenix: THE X-FILMS HAVE ALWAYS SUCKED!
  15. Always Be My Maybe: Starring Ali Wong and Randall Park. Similar to what Will had said, I went into this expecting an Asian-American version of a throwaway rom-com closer to the side of lame with humor found in any modern-day shitty comedy with white leads. There's a bit of that in this film, there's a lot of woke-awareness jokes that generally fall flat, but I was sympathizing with the two leads and quickly grew interested in seeing how they would turn out. It was a fairly sad story in the beginning. Once Keanu Reeves pops up, the movie is set on fire. Every joke lands, and Reeves gives one of the best performances I've seen from him, as a NPH-esque jokey version of himself that's part d-bag/part internet boyfriend realization. He's A M A Z I N G, cracking me up with every line. The other three actors, Wong, Park and Vivienne Bang are equally hilarious throughout the entire scene. The rest of the movie stays strong with the pathos, and does a good job of making both characters flawed, and even unlikable in the case of Park, but never beyond the point of no return. The story is less about the romance and more about self-actualization, though there is the traditional Hollywood fairy-tale ending. But the entirety of the second act with Reeves automatically makes this the funniest film I've seen all year.
  16. Young Justice #6 (2019): Good. Interesting revelation on Connor's family. Glad the Gemworld stuff seems to be over with. YJ's appeal was always the classic superteen/teenager with normal life balance, so the extraterrestrial stuff doesn't appeal to me. Team books also need to balance the many characters, and these new heroes need more introductions. But the book is still good. The Green Lantern #8: I loved this because Morrison was doing a tribute song to the Hard Traveling Heroes era, while also indulging in his propensity for continuity porn. Liam Sharp's a great artist any day, but his Buscema/Neal Adams influence/homages were a delight. I want this team to do a GA/GL book from now on. Batman #72 (2019): Marginally better than last issue, but this title has been up its own ass for too long. Black Cat #1 (2019): S'alright. This was one of those times where Felicia Hardy and Selina Kyle are hardly differentiated from each other. I liked the artwork once she changed into her BC costume. Single Issues: 193 Trade Paperbacks: 6
  17. That reminded me, and I think I told my girlfriend who was watching it with me the moment that scene came up, of the introduction to Jay and Silent Bob from Clerks. "I hate guys. I LOVE WOMEN!" It was a low point in a generally kid-friendly movie. And maybe there could still be gay panic jokes about insecure guys done today (certainly I'm not the one to say whether or not), but the use of that f-word was nevertheless unfortunate. We actually did do an episode about "Problematic Faves" last year, but like all discussion topics it can easily be returned to for further and harder analysis. We kinda got caught up in indulging some of our favorites anyway.
  18. Yesss, had never seen it before, like a number of 80s films.
  19. Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure: Amusing. It's a total cartoon with zero heft to it. I really didn't find it funny, but Bill and Ted's good-natured idiocy does grow on you after a while. I'd be interested to know where the story idea came from because it's almost cynical in its simplicity. IDK how a modern sequel is gonna play, and atm I'm thinking probably like the recent Dumb and Dumber sequel. Behind the Candalabra: Starring Michael Douglas and Matt Damon. Chronicling the relationship between Liberace and Scott Thorson, this is a pretty gritty, dark, almost thoroughly unpleasant exercise in emotional violence. Knowing nothing about Liberace, I thought Michael Douglas gave one helluva transformative performance. This is one of those films that stuck with me for the rest of the night, and one that I worry may play into latent/learned homophobia with some viewers. There's absolutely nothing positive about the relationship between Liberace and Thorson depicted in the movie, from the very creepy, stalkerish beginnings to its manipulative ends. The ending, with Damon's Thorson imagining Liberace rising into Heaven, didn't make any sense to me considering all the hell the guy put him through. But the character that Douglas portrays is presented as a conniving, bullying, lustful, emotionally neglectful bastard. It's an awful relationship, and as a result the film watches like a two hour homophobic screed against love between two men by playing into stereotypes. I'm sure that wasn't the intent, but I can see people walking away from this movie feeling justified in their bigoted feelings.
  20. My reaction is more positive now than it was when Batfleck was announced way back when. Not that I have anything against Affleck as an actor, but he's pretty recognizable as himself, the actor. Pattinson is too, but strikes a better look in my opinion.
  21. Nicholas Hoult probably would've stepped up to do a good job, but I'm glad Pattinson hit the landing. He just has a better profile for Batman IMO.
  22. Happy Birthday Andrew!!!
  23. Heroes in Crisis #9: An annoying montage of characters misdiagnosing their personal problems while King fails to justify the bullshit from the previous issue makes this probably the weakest story he's ever written. Doomsday Clock #9: This story will certainly be better in the trade. I love the confronting the many origins and revisions of Superman. The last several issues have kept me mightily intrigued. Detective Comics Annual #2 (2019): I'm not generally a great fan of Batman Year Two, but this was a solid little story with witty writing and good artwork. Recommended. Batman: The Last Knight of Earth #1: This surprised me. There's a huge bait and switch going from the promotion of this story to the actual opening pages of it, and it kept me interested all the way through. Amazing Spider-Man #822-#823: Really interesting end to the Hunted storyline. #822 had me so excited for the next issue, and I thought the story concluded logically. It's a good sequel to both Last Hunt and Grim Hunt, and hopefully ends Kraven's storyline once and for all, for real this time. This was the most serious I've read in ASM in a long, long time. Spencer really has brought back a maturity to this title that's been missing for well over a decade. Immortal Hulk #17-#18: FUGGIN' AWESOME Single Issues: 189 Trade Paperbacks: 6