Sign in to follow this  
The Master

Every comic you've read in 2017

Recommended Posts

The Immortal Iron Fist: The Complete Collection - But it is not complete.  Boo.  Otherwise, I liked this.  Not the biggest fan of the triple narratives, but it all worked out in the end.  I look forward to Vol 2.

Single Issues: 0
Trades/Graphic Novels: 14 (90)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ether 3-4: Kindt continues to be real good at building his mysteries (though I think I know where part of it is going), and Rubin knocks the art in this out of the park. Props especially to issue 4 for going somewhere I did not expect and mostly centering a flashback from a character we haven't seen.

Mayday 4: *"I Predict a Riot" intensifies* Also, that two page spread at the demonstration is NUTS.

Monstress 10: This comic continues to be amazingly illustrated, on all levels. I buy this when I need to read something real pretty, and this week was kinda shit.

Single Issues: 87
Trades/Graphic Novels: 19
Omnibuses: 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Violent Love #2: better.

Voracious: Feeding Time #1: this is garbage.

Warlords of Appalachia #2: this is great.

White #1: this was good, and very innovative for comics. Pretty movie derivative, but new for comics. Solid.

Wolfcop #2: I'm done with this shit.

Wrath of the Eternal Warrior #14: wow. Was this the last issue? It felt like it.

Hawkeye #1: this was ok. Not great. Never been a fan of this Kate Bishop character.

Mayday #2: ok, I've seen The Americans. I'm out.

Rockstars #1: solid.

Comics: 201
Trades: 9

Graphic Novels: 7

Omnibuses: 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nightwing #15 and #16 (2016): The Rebirth issue and first issue really did not impress me, but a friend told me to check out the last two issues. These were very solid. I loved the display of Dick's relationship with all the major people in his life (Batman, Robin, Jason Todd, Starfire, Barbara, Wally). His relationship with his girlfriend feels genuine and it's heading in intriguing places. I guess I'm back on this title.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Punisher (2009) #1-5: In the wake of Secret Invasion and Norma Osborn's rise to power, The Punisher attempts to assassinate the former Green Goblin. This leads to run-ins with The Sentry and The Hood, two of Osborn's goons. During the fight with The Sentry, Castle is saved by a straightedge, tech-savvy, modern punk named Henry Russo. Henry is also the son of Jigsaw, which The Punisher does not initially realize.

We're sold a battle between The Punisher and The Green Goblin, but we get Castle pushed off onto The Sentry then The Hood. While reading it, the storyline flows nicely, with much thanks to Jerome Opeña's scratch-yet-cinematic pencils. He sells the big action moments as both static, iconic shots and fluid, linked panels that lead from one beat to the next. Dan Brown's muted, earthy pallet goes a long way to make the story, too. If for nothing else, these issues are at least worth looking at for Opeña and Brown. The writing, though? The moment I finished the books, I forgot most everything that had transpired.

As a side note, The Punisher having access to tech that once belonging to Ant-Man and Iron Man -- while creating some inventive kills -- seems off. Granted, yeah, The Punisher will use any means necessary to kill gangsters and villains, but it doesn't work for me. (I mean, how does he know how to use Pym Particles? And an Iron Man gauntlet has its own power source?)

Punisher (2009) #6-10, Annual #1: Oh! My! God! So fucking tedious! The Hood throws wave after wave after wave of chumps at The Punisher. Then he throws wave after wave after wave of chumps at The Punisher. Then he does it again and again, and it all means nothing because these are long-dead characters no one remembers that have been returned from the grave only to be slaughtered again. It's utterly pointless. A lot of the returned-from-the-dead minions are, naturally, worried about fighting The Punisher; they're worried about dying all over again. But the thing is, despite spending a lot of time with them, we never get to know them as individuals; we're never told why we should care about any of them, other than they're Bronze Age characters that all died in 1985 and 86. Worse, they all melt into one. 

On another note: So we started this whole mess with Castle going after Osborn, who says, "I'm too busy to deal with this. Sentry, get him." Then Sentry says, "Okay, I'm done. Hood, your turn." Hood plays around a bit, then says to his risen-from-the-dead cronies, "You get him. I'm too busy resurrecting Castle's family from the grave." So by the end of it, The Punisher has gone from fighting a main-event heel to the cronies of a low-end stable. Even though Castle wins, that is a negative push. That would be like fighting Hulk Hogan for the Heavyweight title one month, feuding with Rick Rude for the Intercontinental Championship for the next two months, having a string of matches with the Honky Tonk Man for three months after that, then going after The Bolsheviks on the house show circuit.

Oh yeah, and what happens after The Hood breathes new life into the long-dead Castle Clan? Frank murders his wife and kids with fire! Why? "They're not my family. They're dead! I'm alone! My war! Crime! GRRRRrrrrrr!"

Also, Miracle Man's existence continues to plague me!

Dark Reign: The List - Punisher: Already said my bit about how Castle was dismembered.

Punisher (2009) #11-16: The Punisher is brought back to life as a hulking monstrosity by Morbius, who has the Bloodstone and is trying to protect other monsters. In the process, they run afoul of Robert Hellsgaard and his action-science team: Hunter of Monster Special Force.

This was kinda fun, I will admit. Especially the bits with Giganto and the dragon flying over Japan. But Remender's "Grim!" narration of Castle is so very grating. And it only gets worse. Much like the first five issues were made by Opeña and Brown, these six are sold by Tony Morre's amazingly expressive features and more of Brown's deep colors. If you can make me feel for Moloids, you've done an amazing job.

Franken-Castle #17-18: In an effort to mend the battle-damaged Franken-Castle, Morbius places the Bloodstone inside The Punisher's body. Thus beginning the end of his monstrous state, as it will "regenerate him over time." (This is a nice backdoor, providing Marvel with an eventual out for the Franken-Castle Punisher.)

In these two, Castle visits the graves of his recently re-buried family, only to be attacked by The Shaolin Scientist Squad and a female assassin. He then gears up for another trip to Japan, leading to a fight with an ousted Hand assassin. It's initially unclear that she's not the same female assassin from the previous issue. Either way, these two issues do nothing but place Castle in Tokyo, leading to...

Dark Wolverine #88, Franken-Castle #19, Dark Wolverine #89, and Franken-Castle #20: The Punisher wants revenge on Daken for murdering him, and, if not for Wolverine, he would have succeeded. Marjorie Liu and Daniel Way write the Dark Wolverine issues.

Some reenactments from these issues:

Daken (by Liu and Way): I am so bi, it's crazy! Did you know I like to have sex with women and men? Oooohhh, yeah! Let me make not-so-subtle double entendres. Mmmmhhh! Sexy sex time with sex!

He's written like a teenage boy's idea of bisexuality, where sex is the only thing ever on his mind and all he ever speaks about. While I commend Marvel for introducing a bisexual character in the form of Daken, making him a crazed, hyper-sexual murderer was a major misstep, and these two issues plainly illustrate that. 

Daken (by Remender): I am so Wolverine, but without the honor of a Samurai! Death to my father! Quip!

Wolverine: You ain't killin' my boy, Castle.
Punisher: Yes I am.
Wolverine: Ain't gonna happen.
Punisher: It is.
Wolverine: Nope. If anyone's killin' that boy, it's gonna be me.
Punisher: Hurm.
Wolverine: Rabbit season.
Punisher: Duck season.
Wolverine: Rabbit season.
Punisher: Duck seaso..., I won't stop till he's dead.
Wolverine: Hurm.

Franken-Castle #21: Marvel hastily wraps up the Franken-Castle storyline but dropping The Punisher on Monster Island for a few months, most of which we never see. By the end, he's fully human once more, rejuvenated, and ready to kill mobsters back in New York City.

Punisher: In the Blood #1-5: Used to tie-up loose ends, this mini sees Castle chasing down Microchip (who helped The Hood resurrect The Castles), Henry (because Castle thinks he's bad like his father), Jigsaw (because he's Jigsaw), Stuart Clarke (because he went bad in another storyline), and that female assassin from the graveyard (who may or may not be Maria Castle).

This is Remender putting all of the piece back the way he found them before departing The Punisher. Castle is no longer a beast, Microchip is dead, bodies are re-buried, Henry is back with his mom, The Punisher is alone once more, he's killing crooks, and the question of Maria's fate is answered. Outside of a slightly touching moment at the very end, there's not a lot here to recommend over other Punisher books.

As for the Franken-Castle portion of Remender's run: it didn't wow me. It lasts 10 1/2 issues (excluding the Dark Wolverine tie-ins), and doesn't go far enough to place The Punisher inside the ranks of The Legion of Monsters. Besides his new look, a need to take pills, and who he's fighting for, nothing new is brought to the character; he continues to work alone, refusing to accept the graces of his newfound family. This type of drastic change should have provided the creative team a chance to take Frank Castle on a major character arc. Without making him a liberal hippie, like Henry, the point of this type of change is to reconnect Castle with his humanity. If monsters show love and compassion and acceptance, why can't he do the same? There are real opportunities to explore Frank Castle, including his decision to torch his family back to death. Instead, he continues to growl about The War and Darkness and Grim. He learns nothing, and changes not one bit. While this may come down to the limited number of issues Remender had to play with Franken-Castle, a lot can be done in 10-plus books.

Maybe if you're a bigger fan of the horror / monster side of Marvel, this will do more for you. For me, it was familiar at best, tedious at worst, and filled with missed opportunities.

Sorry, guys. I tried to like it.

Comics: 86

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Immortal Iron Fist: The Complete Collection - That name still annoys me.  Anywho, this went downhill quickly.  To start, the art is complete shit.  The main series is a mess.  The Immortal Weapons are lacking, which is a shame, as I feel they could be a fun team.  Also, too much filler about random Iron Fists.  Focus on Danny and call it a day.  The Immoral Weapons mini is included, but again, it is lacking.  Get back stories (finally) on 3 of the 5, but they felt like I was reading an illustrated Wiki page. 

Single Issues: 0
Trades/Graphic Novels: 15 (108)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shipwreck 3: There's a Borges nod and finally some backstory as to what in the fuck is going on. Phil Hester and crew remain good.
Black Panther 7-10: Fuck, there's a lot of talking. It's great quality talking, but goddamn, is there a lot of it. Shouts out to the art team to make all the exposition and interactions dynamic. Reading this makes me sad, because this is what superhero comics should be at a median level, but few, few teams are permitted this much latitude. Then again, few teams are this staggeringly talented, so...
Descender 7: I already forgot what happened, but it was pretty. Wait! There's a new version of Tim-23. And he kills people!
Mayday 4: Yes. This. Bring me more things like this.
X-O Manowar 1: The opening "I'm reclining with a superhot alien woman after sex talking about how much I miss my homeworld" is eyebrow raising, but everything after that is so fucking good. X-O Manowar as a grunt in a space Easy Company with the art team's amazing work? Yes. I'm in. We get these for free, and I'm putting it on my pull.
Monstress 10: I don't know what's going on here, but it's gorgeous.
Josie & The Pussycats 4: If I only complain about how I'm pretty sure they got a metal reference wrong, it's petty as fuck. That said: Humor is difficult to work and this comic executed it without a sweat. I get the impression this is Ms. Bennett letting her hair down, and Archie Inc. puts her with a team that plays to that strength. Well done. (Dread, are you aware of a Dutch speedcore scene? Because with a description like that I'm pretty sure they meant Swedish thrash....)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dr. Strange: The Oath: Yes. It warrants the phrase instant classic. Marvel repackaged it in a bigger size, with lots of extras. It's $40, though my LCS had it marked down to $20 because ain't no one playing that game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spider-Man #10: this is one of those tie-ins that treads water plot-wise. We simply get the fallout of Miles' meeting with Cap on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. It's actually done pretty well. Not great though. Completely unnecessary as a Civil War II buy and a little bit of characterization for the character.

Action Comics #970: so much fun, 90s style.

Archie #15: It's 2017. I'm 36 years old. I got a little teary reading an Archie comic. 

Avengers #2.1: this is...ok, I guess. Not sure if I'll be reading much more of this.

Batman #13: pretty decent.

Captain Marvel by Jim Starlin Complete Collection: this is pretty ramshackle. A real cosmic style is developed as it carries on. Admittedly, the finale being the Death of Captain Marvel is still really fucking effective today. Overall, might not totally recommend this. There's much better in the era.

Jack Kirby Pencils and Inks-Artisan Edition: this oversized hardcover collects the penciled and inked pages of the entire first issue slate of his second wave DC stuff (The Demon, Kamandi and OMAC, respectively). Gorgeous. Some great little bonus stuff as well, including original scans of the pages they had to omit and chop up because Jack drew too many pages of The Demon #1. Fucking guy did even more pages than required drawing like 5 or 6 series a month and still managed to get them in on time...

Pandora's Eyes: a graphic novel by Manara. No actual sex in this one, but a little bit of nudity and the threat of sexual violence pervades. An interesting exercise, but a weird little crime tale that's a little more complex than the material deserves.

Comics: 206
Trades: 10

Graphic Novels: 8

Omnibuses: 3

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New Super-Man #1-2: This reminds me a lot of the Superboy comic from after The Death of Superman, but I cannot get into it.

The Brave and the Bold #118 and Marvel Team-Up #32: More thoughts forthcoming in an episode of The Show, but I will quote myself from Twitter: "How is it that the comic with the literal son of Satan and a demonic possession is less weird than the one with The Joker and a puppy?"

Connor Hawke: Dragon's Blood #1-6: This was really fun! It starts out with a legend that leads to an archery competition (which is really a front for a global power grab), leading to a fight with a dragon and a super-powered man in the middle of Shanghai. Stuck in the middle are Connor and Shado. This perfectly balances character development with batshit crazy action. While the original Green Arrow does come up from time to time, he's never dwelled on; Connor is allowed to be his own man, separate from his father's well-known spirit and adventures. In that regard, the dialogue feels more natural; a lesser writer would have had Connor brooding about "my father" this and "my father" that. But Chuck Dixon allows Connor to go about his own business, with Ollie only ever coming up in passing and in natural ways. As for the art: Derec Donovan is amazing! His linework is fluid and has a touch of animation in it, and his characters come to life thanks to wonderful body language and expressions. This is an overlooked gem. If you see back issues anywhere, grab them.

Comics: 96

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doctor Who: The Third Doctor #1-5: This is a lovingly crafted goodbye letter to Doctor Who and its fans by Paul Cornell, who recently made a major career move away from company-owned works. I won't spoil too much, because fans of classic-era Who will have a blast going in with as little foreknowledge as possible, but I will say it fits in perfectly between The Three Doctors and Carnival of Monsters, is tone-appropriate, showcases many familiar faces, and foreshadows events involving Mike Yates. 

Dan, we have to cover this as a BOTI special.

Comics: 101

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Star Trek: Captain's Log - Sulu: The Tholians are mad because they're the Tholians, and it's up to Captain Sulu to smooth over the situation. Meanwhile, he has to save the crew of another Federation ship, making him late to the meeting with the Tholians, which makes them even angrier. While the issue does a good job showcasing Captain Sulu as a leader, I'm not sure what the story was trying to accomplish overall.

Star Trek: Captain's Log - Harriman: Six months after Captain Kirk's death on the Enterprise B, Bones is conscripted back into service aboard the same ship. Initially he's an outright jerk to Captain Harriman, blaming him for his friend's death. At the same time, Harriman is on the cusp of resigning from Starfleet, due to his guilt. With that in mind, it's an interesting take on the fan reaction to Harriman; using a classic character like Bones to vent his frustration over the death of Kirk makes sense, and it then serves to lift Harriman up when Bones eventually learns to respect the young captain. While not the best sci-fi adventure comic, it is a good character piece and repairs a character that was needlessly thrown under the bus. The art, here, is fantastic; without being too photorealistic, it perfectly captures an aged DeForest Kelley and the worrisome face of Alan Ruck.

Star Trek: Captain's Log - Pike: A tired Captain Pike tries to make sense of the recent events on Talos IV, but he has no time to steady himself before another deadly adventure calls. Twelve years later, he's called back into action, and suffers a horrific fate while saving a young crew from fiery deaths. This one has a solid mixture of action, danger, pathos, and regret. Pike feels the pain and guilt of every life lost under his command, and it comes through on the page without being overbearing; he's an exhausted military man who's seen too many battles and bodies, leaving him with a hole in his heart that can never be filled. It's all there on the page, in both the writing and art, and the final panels are heartbreaking.

Star Trek: Captain's Log - Jellico: Oddly, this is more about the eventual Captain Leslie Wong than it is about the wildly misunderstood and underrated Captain Jellico. As a commander, Wong is drafted to the USS Cairo a few months before Jellico would take temporary command of the Enterprise D. She is thrust straight into action against the Cardassians, and bristles at Jellico's every command. This was the one I was most looking forward to, as I am a huge fan of Captain Jellico, so I was eager to see how he was treated here. While he isn't as brisk as in Chain of Command, he is still firm-but-fair with his crew. Unlike with the Enterprise, he's already whipped these people into shape. So while they may not enjoy his style of captaining, they've come to accept it and work well under his command. Bringing in Wong was a good choice, in that it shows her as the outside to Jellico's well-oiled machine. Whereas, in Chain of Command, he's the outsider stepping into the command role. The reversal does a good job highlighting Jellico without putting him in the starring role. Though -- and this is admitted personal preference -- I definitely wanted more Jellico. 

Comics: 105

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Batman / Deathblow: After the Fire #1-3: This starts out making sense, and looks great. Deathblow wants to kill some guy because Deathblow works for IO. Batman wants to track the same person, 10 years later, because Deathblow failed. Then nothing fucking makes sense because FLASHBACKS / CIA / FLASHBACKS / FBI / FLASHBACKS / IO / FLASHBACKS / YOU'RE TOO STUPID TO GET IT BECAUSE I'M THE WRITER AND I'M SUPER-DUPER-MEGA-SMART-I-AM-I-AM-I-AM-I-AM-I-AM-I-AM / FLASHBACKS / FUUUUUUCCCCKKK YOU! The end.

Comics: 108

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nightwing #16: Fingers crossed that this ends well, but this could wind up being very bad for Tim Seeley if he mishandles the resolution of this new storyline.

Superman #18: The four-part Superman Reborn begins with a punch to the gut for Lois and Clark. Solid issue issue that actively has me anticipating the second part.

Comics: 110

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Champions #4-#6: Overall I'm enjoying this titles. I like Humberto Ramos and Waid's doing good work here. I'm getting tired of the Social Justice angle because it feels trite. I want more interpersonal team dynamics and so far overall this is starting to read like Captain Planet. Issue #6 presents a beguiling premise with the Freelancers, so I hope that starts an upswing in stakes for the team.

Superman #18: I've been behind on this book and Action, and not because I wasn't enjoying them (the bi-monthly schedule has been really hard for me to keep up with). But since this is the start of the new arc I jumped back in. Very interested to see where everything heads, especially that this involves what's going on with Tim over in Detective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shipwreck 3: Oh hey, the plot finally showed up. Hester continues to do gorgeous work on this, and you can tell that he's getting his eyesight back after having a double eye transplant - there's more detail in certain areas of his work.

Gotham Academy: Second Semester 1-3: Continues to be cute and fun, I think I might've read some of this last year when it was still on my pull, but it's still a great mix of boarding school meets vague threatening mystery meets obscure Bat Trivia. Basically a really good boarding school AU with lots of OCs. 

Black Panther 7-10: So, I clearly missed something that went down in issues 5 and 6, but I can still follow where Coates is going here. Interesting reading this in the wake of having read the Beautiful Struggle, because I can see a lot of what he and his dad talked about played out in some aspects of this. Sprouse and Stelfreeze are gorgeous as always. This is still gonna read better on the whole when they do the inevitable 12 issue collection (instead of 3 separate trades). 

(Jim bought these back for me from DC from Fantom Comics, it was a great way to unwind last night.)

Single Issues: 95
Trades/Graphic Novels: 19
Omnibuses: 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Batman Beyond #3: alright, I think we're done here.

Black Hammer #6: this was REALLY good.

Bloodshot USA #3: solid.

Briggs Land #5: this was pretty decent.

Captain America Sam Wilson #16: ok, getting REALLY fucking tired of the social justice brigade here. Can we try and tell a fucking story that matters for the characters ere without trying to tie yourself to some overarching point? Oh, leaking sex tapes is bad? Gotcha.

Captain America Steve Rogers #8: This has ot be the most decompressed storyline I've ever read.

Carnage #15: ok, interesting.

Cave Carson Has a Cybernetic Eye #3: Cave Carson had three issues to get my approval and failed miserably.

Civil War II #8: I wonder if I would care about how this ended if the post-Civil War II books haven't been coming out for like three months already?

Clean Room #15:Solid.

Comics: 216
Trades: 10

Graphic Novels: 8

Omnibuses: 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jessica Jones #1-5: I like what Bendis is doing here, especially as he seems to be laying the groundwork for an upcoming story (event?) that will deal with the merged universe. The first two issues are a little bit of a struggle, though, because Bendis keeps us in the dark too long, but once we're told more it picks up.

Comics: 115

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bullseye #2: Big step up from the first issue. If it stays at this level, I'll finish the opening storyline.

Comics: 117

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kill Or Be Killed issue one: Yawn. It's Brubaker and Phillips and Breitweiser, so it looks gorgeous, but it's the most boring premise I've yet seen from the team.
Rumble v1: Arcudi and Harren and Stewart do off-brand BPRD, which makes sense, given they made BPRD for years. Hell yeah.

Weird combination of teams doing what they're known for. In Kill or be Killed, I disliked it, in Rumble, I loved it. Maybe I haven't read enough of Arcudi and Harren and Stewart to see the strings yet? Maybe Harren and Stewart get more rope from me because they've got a wider palate? If I dislike it in one place (and assuming everything else is equal), I ought to dislike it in another place.

Edited by jim
Bolding titles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kill Or Be Killed issue one: Yawn. It's Brubaker and Phillips and Breitweiser, so it looks gorgeous, but it's the most boring premise I've yet seen from the team.
Rumble v1: Arcudi and Harren and Stewart do off-brand BPRD, which makes sense, given they made BPRD for years. Hell yeah.

Weird combination of teams doing what they're known for. In Kill or be Killed, I disliked it, in Rumble, I loved it. Maybe I haven't read enough of Arcudi and Harren and Stewart to see the strings yet? Maybe Harren and Stewart get more rope from me because they've got a wider palate? If I dislike it in one place (and assuming everything else is equal), I ought to dislike it in another place.

I'll reduce that assessment of Kill or Be Killed 1 to one resounding word: mehhhhhhhhh.

I was starting to drift while he was reading through Rumble, I'll give it a shot another time.

Single Issues: 96
Trades/Graphic Novels: 19
Omnibuses: 1

Edited by Venneh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Star Wars: Infinities - A New Hope #1-4: During the Battle of Yavin, Luke hits his target on the Death Star, but his torpedoes detonate too soon; the space station survives. Though a handful of Rebels escape, all seems lost when Yavin IV is destroyed. Thus, a new reality is created where Leia becomes a pawn of The Empire, and Luke spends years training with Yoda.

This was the best of these three What If?-style Star Wars books, in that it takes its time to develop the alternate reality and fates of every character, though I would have liked a bigger focus on Leia. After witnessing the destruction of Alderaan, Yavin IV, and the Rebellion, her anger is mighty; it does not take much for Vader to push her to the Dark Side. A few more pages of this would have been fascinating. Hell, if Marvel was willing to revisit this idea, I could see an entire series made from Leia's turn.

Star Wars: Infinities - The Empire Strikes Back #1-4: On Hoth, Luke is gravely wounded by the wampa. As he lays dying, Obi-Wan implores him to visit Dagobah. But it's too late; his wounds are too serious. With his final words, Luke tells Han of Yoda and Dagobah. From this, Han believes he will train to become a Jedi, but it is Leia's destiny to destroy Vader.

The final issue and the characterization of Han prevent this series from being the best of the three minis. Instead of an epic battle between father and daughter, we get Vader v Yoda fan-service within Vader's tormented psyche. Visually, said battle (and the series overall) stands up these 15 years later, but Leia is actively absent from most of the fight; she's off hunting for crystals (really) while ghosts of Obi-Wan, Mace, and Qui-Gon weaken Vader psychically. Worst of all, Leia only delivers one blow to Vader before Han shoots him to death. The end.

As for Han, he spends the first and second issue prancing about, virtually singing "I'm gonna be a Jedi" minutes after burying his buddy in the snow. When he learns it's Leia, he has a tantrum.

Otherwise, this was enjoyable.

Star Wars: Infinities - Return of the Jedi #1-4: Luke's plan to rescue Han from Jabba goes horribly wrong, allowing Boba Fett to flee with the carbonite-encased body. Yet, fate still leads everybody to the forest moon of Endor and the second Death Star. In the end, the joint effort of Leia and Luke results in Vader living and joining the Rebellion. However, The Emperor lives to torment them another day.

Plain and simple, I did not like this one. This is early Image artwork but in 2004, with thick, inky lines in some places and thin, scratchy lines elsewhere. It's wholly inconsistent, ugly, and very rushed. This is honestly a page from the second issue:

star-wars-rubbish.jpg

What the hell is up with R2, and what did they do to Yoda's face?

The story is a little better than whatever that image is, and Leia is an absolute badass, but none of this was enough to hook me in the alternate reality.

Skip this one.

Comics: 129

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.