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A PPV from Manchester, England and the first ever weekly TV show to emanate live from the World's Most Famous Arena are the highlights of Week 38 of A Cure for the Common Podcast. The dos and don'ts of how to handle a popular wrestler's homecoming, the match Bret Hart has deemed his last great WWF contest, the continuation of the worst tournament in the history of professional wrestling, and something about Vince McMahon and Steve Austin you might have heard about are all covered this week. [ 4:45:23 || 137.1 MB ]

 

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On 10/28/2018 at 3:40 PM, SteveJRogers said:

Unfortunate timing for a "Roman Reigns can't get cheered" joke :(

Yeah, you don't say. 

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20 hours ago, The Master said:

Semper Guy killed me!

It really was sheer luck, right place/right time for the NAO to become one of the Fed’s greatest tag teams.  

To think of the drek they came out of (including an at the end LOD, and Billy as a multiple time tag champ) and the divison renaissance that occurred just after their incredibly short run, when you think about it, on top ends, it is amazing how they are still seen as actual legends (not the branding of former superstars).  

Yes being in DX during the height of their face populartiy helps, but as I said, that is where luck played a part in their place in history.

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Agreed. While I am a mark for the New Age Outlaws (Billy Gunn specifically), looking back they became popular thanks to Road Dogg's entrance and Hunter needing lackeys for his version of DX. This isn't meant to knock the team or guys as individuals; they deserved their championship reigns and were entertaining for a spell, but their shtick got familiar after a while and I'm not sure they would be as fondly remembered had the tag division been mega-hot at the time.

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If you get a chance, I'd recommend the Attitude Era podcast which is hosted by 3 university chums under 30. The main host is Irish and watched the entire era (defined as WM14 to WM17) contemporaneously, whereas his English colleagues have respectively watched the latter half of the era at the time, and wasn't watching wrestling at all at the time.

I bring this up because the guy who didn't start watching wrestling until 2006 (the poor guy) immediately took a dislike to the New Age Outlaws and managed to ruin them for the other hosts by pointing out how formulaic they were. 

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2 hours ago, slothian said:

If you get a chance, I'd recommend the Attitude Era podcast which is hosted by 3 university chums under 30. The main host is Irish and watched the entire era (defined as WM14 to WM17) contemporaneously, whereas his English colleagues have respectively watched the latter half of the era at the time, and wasn't watching wrestling at all at the time.

I bring this up because the guy who didn't start watching wrestling until 2006 (the poor guy) immediately took a dislike to the New Age Outlaws and managed to ruin them for the other hosts by pointing out how formulaic they were. 

I can see that happening to any “uber popular team.” The New Day, as an example, I can see being picked apart by a newbie coming at it nearly 10 years after they were at their peak.

Probably didn’t help that by 2006 the tag scene was pretty cooled off that it would take until the rise if Usos & New Day to get back to the levels of its late Attitude Era (E&C, Hardys, Dudleys) glory.

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2 hours ago, SteveJRogers said:

I can see that happening to any “uber popular team.” The New Day, as an example, I can see being picked apart by a newbie coming at it nearly 10 years after they were at their peak.

Probably didn’t help that by 2006 the tag scene was pretty cooled off that it would take until the rise if Usos & New Day to get back to the levels of its late Attitude Era (E&C, Hardys, Dudleys) glory.

I mean, all tag teams are formulaic to some extent - the big teams in the 1980s being a prime example. It's more the storylines that they involve themselves in that, to me, defines them. Think how damn bland The Usos were a couple of years ago before they turned heel and had an epic feud with The New Day. As far as I'm concerned, the Outlaws never had a big match or major rivalry that defined them as an all-time great match - they were merely the most over team in a poor era of tag wrestling.

Incidentally, I think history will be kinder to the New Day, as they've not only had some great matches/feuds, but their promos, side projects and ability to switch out members through the Freebird rule have kept them fresh and given them longevity.

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