Recommended Posts

Kirk sits in a chair ("Dagger of the Mind"), and a child trolls The Enterprise ("The Corbomite Maneuver"). Along the way, Mike announces a very surprising Star Trek comic book crossover, Dan looks for drink recipes, and they completely disagree when it comes to Balok. [ 1:17:24 || 37.6 MB ]

To listen, click here: http://www.earth-2.net/podcasts/theedgeofforever/episodes/theedgeofforever_005.mp3

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly, I've had to sell most of my books in the last few years, and that included all of my Star Wars novels. Really, though, it's fine because there came a point where I was only buying them to collect rather than read.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I stopped buying books awhile back, too, but now that they've announced the reset of continuity (and the fact that novels now "count" in official canon), I might start buying them again. I'll try to read them all at least.

I've dabbled in Trek novels, but never really found them to be very good on average. Apparently the fact that they were declared non-canon significantly lowered the quality threshold at some point.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the first three new Star Wars novels on order. I bought them regularly starting with Heir to the Empire (I still have my first edition on my shelf) for the first two years or so until I realized I wasn't really digging any of the ones not written by Tim Zahn. Expanded Universe stuff tends to fluctuate in quality in any franchise; Wars and Trek are no exceptions. However, I'll try the first handful of new novels and see what we're dealing with.

I read Trek novels voraciously as a kid. In the days before TNG, that was how you got your fix between movies. They were generally written for a teenage audience in mind, so reading them now tends to be an exercise in disappointment (some early ones, a pair of short story collections called The New Voyages, were literally fanfics found in 'zines from the 1970s that Pocket Books threw a couple hundred bucks at some housewives for the rights. I admit that I loved these as a kid, but reading them now is cringe-inducing). However, the James Blish adaptations from the 1960s were really good and still hold up terrifically well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The only two Trek novels I own are The Return and Avenger, both written by William Shatner. And by "written by William Shatner," I mean "sorta written by Shatner, but obviously ghostwritten by someone else." They're about James T. Kirk being resurrected after the events of Generations, and... they're kinda good, actually. Cheesy as all get-out, as anything Shatner-made would obviously be (the part where the Romulan captain lady tries to seduce 70-something Kirk stands out), but they're good on the whole.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The first time I saw The Corbomite Maneuver, I was maybe seven years old. As soon as the episode was over, my dad walked to the kitchen and came back with a cup of orange liquid and handed it to me.

"What's this?" I asked.

"Tranya!"

"But... what is it?"

"Tranya!"

"..."

"Just drink it."

"..." *sip*

It was orange juice mixed with sprite. Seven-year-old Aaron thought it tasted amazing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.