The Kirby Letters :grumble:


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Since the first day of school, I have been trying to figure out who left the following letter (written in caps) on my desk. Commentary in bold.

Dear Mr. Reddick

I just wanted to let you know that Jack Kirby was a hack.

Everyone knows that Stan "The Man" Lee taught Kirby everything he knew. Right.

Can you explain, by the way, why Black Bolt and Black Canary have essentially the same power? They could switch costumes and no one would be the wiser. Well, maybe they would.Everyone's a comedian

Exelsior! sic

D.

This taught me: a) Google can very easily be used for evil and b)this person has no idea what they are talking about.

This morning I come back in after accusing one of my students of it (who clearly at least knows who wrote it) to find another letter written on the back of said letter 1:

Dear Mr. Reddick

Having read a number of your columns concerning that hack, Jack kirby, I couldn't help noticing you are quite critical of Mr. Kirby's contributions to Marvel Comics but fairly sympathetic to Stan "The Man" Lee. And they don't like to actually read my columns

This is a wise tack tactic?, indeed. As everyone knows, Lee was forced to physically guide the hand of "The King" in order to ensure his vsiion reached the page unimpeeded sic. In fact, it is known by a few that as Lee's unique genius flowed like a current through Kirby's hand, Kirby was heard to cry out in exultation and very nearly spoiled the page with his tears.

Exelsior! sic

D

Again, doesn't know shit. But still writes with a style that excludes many culprits. Few spelling mistakes and creative phrasing with some religious overtones.

But they slipped up. It comes with a Captain America head sketch on a sticky note that leaves no room for speculation on who the artist is...I just don't think he wrote the letter.

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Just so you know, tack is originally a seafaring term for course, for example "tacking into the wind". It applies to positioning the sails and the boat in the best way to get where you are going.

Yes, they've used it correctly. In the modern vernacular it can apply to a line of questioning or discussion. They are still doucebags but they were right in thier use of that term.

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Just so you know, tack is originally a seafaring term for course, for example "tacking into the wind". It applies to positioning the sails and the boat in the best way to get where you are going.

Yes, they've used it correctly. In the modern vernacular it can apply to a line of questioning or discussion.

Well, I'll be!

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I teach English at an alternate school of kids aged 16-early 20s.

You can look at it this way: your students care enough about your opinion to ruffle your feathers. They probably wanted to get a rise out of you...

Either that or they're Stan Lee enthusiasts. Either way, life is more exciting ;)

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If the grammar was a bit off you could always leave it in a place where they could find it, and see that you've fixed it.

You could always right a strongly worded reply to "Stan Lee Love" or "King Killer" Or whatever you want to call the person, and write a nice reply stating your points and opinion then writing it just correctly, tell them to go f**k themselves.

Oh, is it just me who writes like that..... :shocked:

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