Episode 130


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It's a double dose of Desmond and Darryll this week as they do a Roadkill Review of the latest Martin Scorsese film, Shutter Island. Then they sit back to review the period piece House of the Devil while playing songs recorded no later than 1989! There's tons of homoerotic tension and giggling, as well as some wonky audio in the feedback section. Par for the course in this massive episode of Dread Media! Tunes include: "Welcome Home (Sanitarium)" by Metallica, "Island of Domination" by Judas Priest, "Shout at the Devil" by Motley Crue, and "Sanity" by Bad Religion. [ 1:28:12 || 40.5 MB ]

The above is from: http://www.earth-2.net/podcasts/dreadmedia/episodes/dreadmedia_130.mp3

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Just wanted to say that this episode features two films I was really looking forward to (one moreso than the other) and I am delighted that my expectations weren't only not let down, but exceeded. :yes:

The audio during the feedback thing: I don't have a fucking clue what was the matter with it. It seemed fine with my audio and the voicemail but when the two tracks were paired together, all of a sudden in sounded like it came form the bottom of a glass. And usually I'm recording with a glass in hand. I could have probably figured it out but I was too damned tired and it was only a small part of a great episode.

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Just wanted to say the author whose name eluded me during the SHUTTER ISLAND review is Kazuo Ishiguro. He wrote THE UNCONSOLED. A real mindfuck of a book about a pianist exploring an unnamed european city. If you're into challenging, Kafkaesque dream-like narratives give it a try. It was the spiral nature of the plot that reminded me of SHUTTER ISLAND. A movie I know I will get many, many spins when the DVD arrives.

SHUTTER ISLAND double feature - Steven Soderbergh's KAFKA (1991) or Alan Parker's ANGEL HEART (1987). Take your pick. All fantastic pictures. According to Roger Ebert, Scorsese showed his cast a 1947 noir called OUT OF THE PAST before shooting commenced. I must track this film down.

On HOUSE OF THE DEVIL - A complete surprise for me. While the problems I mention regarding the finale still stand my affection for this picture has grown with time. Our heroine bopping around the house with the Fixx on her giant walkman really plucked my strings. Skinny jeans and feathered hair are my new fetishes.

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That's probably for the best, Preston. While Dread and I tread very carefully around spoilers, this picture is almost impossible to talk about without giving some stuff away. Feel free to skip ahead to our HOUSE OF THE DEVIL review, though. I'm a bit worried it will be overshadowed by SHUTTER ISLAND and that would be a shame. It's a true gem and comes highly recommended.

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Haven't listened to the episode yet, but I want to chime in on Shutter Island. The editing was choppy, the acting was so-so, I didn't think the mystery was compelling (though I read the book ages ago, so that might have contributed to it), and the climax had way too much exposition.

Don't get me wrong, I didn't hate the film. But it was not as strong as I would have liked.

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Really, Master? I kind of see where you're coming from regarding the mystery but let me say this. I don't feel the mystery is for us (the viewers) to solve per se. It is for Teddy to discover and we are along for the ride. There are far greater rewards to be had than solving the mystery ahead of time (which I feel the majority of filmgoers will do). The level of detail is monumental, the score is devastating, the dream sequences mesmerizing. Solving or not solving Teddy's secret does not detract in any way from the emotional toll his discovery takes on him and on the viewer.

I can't really speak to the editing issue until I've had a second viewing (which may happen sooner rather than later) but who's acting did you have the most trouble with? I thought everyone involved was outstanding.

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He's a great actor, but DiCaprio never sold the role for me. Well, except for the last few minutes on the steps. That was the only time I was invested in Teddy.

As for the editing, I'm sure Scorsese was going for something there. Maybe getting us into Teddy's head, showing how messed up he is. But it was distracting.

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Yeah, I’ve had problems with Leo in the past. His AVIATOR was unrealistic and his work in BODY OF LIES was uninspired but he is hardening himself with each role. He was great in the DEPARTED and even better in SHUTTER ISLAND. I can see why Scorsese continues working with him. He’s no De niro but he’s damn close. This was his strongest performance.

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Just wanted to ask anyone that has seen SHUTTER ISLAND if they noticed any inconsistencies in the print they saw? Specifically, I'm referring to the scene with a little girl walking from left to right across the frame just before the car blows up. In the print Dread and I saw she is upside down for just a second. At another spot in the film there is a huge cigarette burn in the corner and the following insert shot has a noticeably green tint to it. Did anyone else notice any apparent flaws in the print they viewed? What was your interpretation? Were these intentional and a part of the look or were they just bad prints? An inquiring mind wants to know.

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After listening to the episode, I left Des a voicemail about this. I too saw the reel change and cigarette burns, but I didn't see the upside down frame.

Also, I think I saw a brief moment where Teddy took a puff from his cigarette but it wasn't in his hand. And when that woman he was questioning received the glass of water, after she chugged it, the glass looked bone dry. Not even a drop was left.

The latter two instances I took as clues to Teddy's state of mind. The quality of the film itself, however, I have no idea what Scorsese was going for there.

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Actually, as I recall the scene with the glass of water, for a split second there wasn't even a glass. Just her hand cupping air. strange.

I remember this.

The smoke thing may have been in the same scene? At that point, video of Dicaprio was reversed while it wasn't reversed on Emily Mortimer

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I didn't get a voicemail from you. When did you leave it?

Very late last night.

Actually, as I recall the scene with the glass of water, for a split second there wasn't even a glass. Just her hand cupping air. strange.

I remember this.

The smoke thing may have been in the same scene? At that point, video of Dicaprio was reversed while it wasn't reversed on Emily Mortimer

The smoking thing was just before the scene with the glass. And now that you mention it, I seem to recall the glass being missing for a second, too.

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  • 2 months later...

He's a great actor, but DiCaprio never sold the role for me. Well, except for the last few minutes on the steps. That was the only time I was invested in Teddy.

I think that was intentional. For most of the film Teddy is man uncertain of himself, he is wounded and not at peace. At the end he is at peace. It is during that one moment on the steps that we (the audience) truly see the man that he really was/is.

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  • 8 months later...

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