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Its where the cliffhanger from 75 is resolved and it leads into New Thunderbolts. Its also where you get the explanation of why Moonstone is in a coma, Jolt comes back, and Dallas Riordan gets to kick a bit of ass. Its actually worth reading in my opinion.

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Transmetropolitan Vol. 5-10: Brilliant middle and final acts to an already brilliant book. This is my new favorite comic book series of all time. Best moments come during issues #6 (not for devout believers; issue will probably turn you off from the series for good), #8, #31, #32, #33, #40, #50, #51, #58, #59, and #60. This series now also has the honor of having my favorite quote from a comic book ever:

"They (the police) assume, like most people, that fear will do the trick. Fear will keep everyone in place. Fear will keep everyone distracted from what's going on. 'Let him know we can beat him up, let him know we could have killed him, let the fear shrivel him up.' Fuck that. I'm not afraid of them. They're afraid of me." -Spider Jerusalem, Transmetropolitan #32

Trade paperbacks: 31

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Irredeemable vol. 7-Think about All-Star Superman by Morrison. Then think about it completely devoid of sentimentality. Then think about it monthly. That is what you have with Irredeemable. Easily the best superhero book out there right now. Waid fucking owns it!

Incorruptible vol. 5-Funny reading this smack dab in the middle of reading through Thunderbolts because this might be the best series based on redemption ever done in comics. I love it. The art was much better in this volume and the writing is also super solid. Though not as good as Irredeemable. But with Waid's hardon for Superman, that isn't a surprise.

Tales from the Marvel Vault-I knew I was getting something I probably wasn't going to like when I ordered it but it was like 6 bucks and has Ditko/Busiek/Bagley and Tuska on the cover. 1: Roger Stern and Neil Vokes tell an early tale of Dr. Strange buying the Sanctum Sanctorum and it is fucking superb. 2: Unfortunately it doesn't last long. Nicieza comes back to tell a lost tale of Jack Monroe after his stint as Scourge in Thunderbolts and it's awful. Muddled storywise and Aucoin's art is hard to keep reading. 3:Steve Ditko and Karl Kesel on a Human Torch/Hulk team-up against Wizard. And it is also awful I don't know what I expected, but I can't really take Ditko on anything but Dr. Strange. It's a matter of taste and I understand I'm probably in the minority there. 4:Busiek/Bagley do the Defenders. The art was done from a plot by Nicieza and then it was lost. They gave Busiek the art and told him to make a story out of it and it is a beautiful fucking disaster. I adore it. Bagley's work looks a lot like Larsen, who was the Defenders artist at the time, and that was a nice surprise. It makes me want to go back and read all my Defenders books. 5: Pre-Gambit Remy Lebeau teams up with the Champions against MODOK? DRawn by George Tuska? I'm in. Oh wait...it's written by Scott Lobdell? Gah! 5 stories but only two are good, the Gambit one is alright as an oddity and the other two stink.

Comics: 1387

Trades: 40

Graphic Novels: 1

Omnibuses: 5

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Going through Identity Crisis by Brad Meltzer. I know a lot of people are not fond of it, to put it mildly. I'm reading it as a bit of prep work for the Atop the Fourth Wall review that's coming up. There are a few things I like about it, but I am only half way through at the moment.

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Identity Crisis represents everything wrong with modern comics.

That seems to be the general consensus on this book. I'm trying not start a crazy mess here either.

I've stopped watching Linkara, or keeping up with his reviews, so, if possible, could you post a link to his videos on IC, when they come out? And Identity Crisis isn't bad, it's more random pieces of crap rammed together to make one stupid story that doesn't make much sense:

Why did Dr Light have to commit rape? What did that really add to the story, except making everyone in the DCU a prick? Instead of voting to kill the guy, they vote to mindwipe the victim, and if she ever remembers, they'll talk about how they talked about. This is the one time where if the Justice League killed one villain, it would have been better.

The twist ending felt like it came out of nowhere, to me. Oh Ray, I want you back, I never made this truly clear till two issues ago, and I'm not really a big character, but DC want me to be a villain now, so yeah, I killed her by accident. Then in my haste I set fire to the body, you know, for fun.

The art was nice, but yeah, not a great book,

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I actually love Identity Crisis. Well-written and powerful.

Further than that, you'd be hard-pressed to find a bigger fan of the Giffen/DeMatteis JLA than me and the only real disservice Meltzer did to the JLA was in writing the actual JLA book years later.

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I actually love Identity Crisis. Well-written and powerful.

Further than that, you'd be hard-pressed to find a bigger fan of the Giffen/DeMatteis JLA than me and the only real disservice Meltzer did to the JLA was in writing the actual JLA book years later.

Seconded with what Des said. While I look at Infinite Crisis as what got me back into comics, Identity Crisis was what I used to dip my toe into the pool. I personally never realized there was a backlash against it until Linkara brought it up. As for what the rape of Sue brings to the story, it gave us our red herring villain for the murder of Sue and it helped explain a decades long plothole: why Dr. Light went from being an effective villain to a bumbler.

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Seconded with what Des said. While I look at Infinite Crisis as what got me back into comics, Identity Crisis was what I used to dip my toe into the pool.

While we're talking about divisive books that got us into comics, I suppose this is the best time to confess that the book I used to dip my toe into the pool was Batman: The Long Halloween :facepalm: . I don't know whether it would hold up if I read it now, but I doubt it.

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While we're talking about divisive books that got us into comics, I suppose this is the best time to confess that the book I used to dip my toe into the pool was Batman: The Long Halloween :facepalm: . I don't know whether it would hold up if I read it now, but I doubt it.

The Long Halloween is still good. It's the sequel Dark Victory that is complete garbage.

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Identity Crisis represents everything wrong with modern comics.

That seems to be the general consensus on this book. I'm trying not start a crazy mess here either.

I've stopped watching Linkara, or keeping up with his reviews, so, if possible, could you post a link to his videos on IC, when they come out? And Identity Crisis isn't bad, it's more random pieces of crap rammed together to make one stupid story that doesn't make much sense:

Why did Dr Light have to commit rape? What did that really add to the story, except making everyone in the DCU a prick? Instead of voting to kill the guy, they vote to mind-wipe the victim, and if she ever remembers, they'll talk about how they talked about. This is the one time where if the Justice League killed one villain, it would have been better.

The twist ending felt like it came out of nowhere, to me. Oh Ray, I want you back, I never made this truly clear till two issues ago, and I'm not really a big character, but DC want me to be a villain now, so yeah, I killed her by accident. Then in my haste I set fire to the body, you know, for fun.

The art was nice, but yeah, not a great book,

Linkara's review comes out in January. I'll post the link for you though. :)

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Gotham Central, Book One: In the Line of Duty: Wasn't very high on it at first, but my enjoyment increased as the storylines got stronger. "In the Line of Duty" and "Motive" were decent, but "Half a Life" truly is a must-read. As for the art, I was actually down on it while reading the book even though it's good throughout. I think I was spoiled by having seen Lark's art in Daredevil first, which is influenced by David Mazzuchelli's yet has its own voice, whereas here it was identical to Mazzuchelli's apart from the faces. Even so, it's great artwork and I don't think I've ever seen a Two-Face as good as his.

Trades: 32

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Spider-Man: Reign - Shit. Moving along.

Teen Titans: A Kids Game - I liked it. I felt like I got enough of what happened at the end of Young Justice to not be lost. The superheros fight at the end was a little forced, but it was still nifty to Nightwing be the one to end it.

Marvel Universe vs. The Punisher - Yeah, not a fan of zombies. Might not call them zombies, but they are fucking zombies.

Avengers/X-Men: Maximum Security - Needless crossover that reads very awkwardly in collected form. And the art sucks, lowlight being the Captain America issue.

X-Men: Fairy Tales & Spider-Man: Fairy Tales - Hit of miss. Don't think each needed their own mini tho. Seems like they could have just done a Marvel Fairy Tales mini and been done with it.

Uncanny X-Men: Sisterhood - I was lost. Unlike the Titans book, I was not given any context as to what the hell was going on. All I know is this was after the move to San Fransisco. And the character blurbs got annoying after a while.

Uncanny X-Men First Class: Feared and Hated - Nice little story that I think is out of continuity.

Spider-Man: The Other - I liked it enough, but it seemed to lack a villain of the story. I see how it was designed to get Peter from A to B, but it lacked something.

Spider-Man & Red Sonja - Amazed that there was a mini in 2008 based of an issue of Marvel Team-Up (which is a series I love). But, this felt totally unneeded. I am not really a sword and sorcery type of guy so I don't really care for Sonja which didn't help.

Trades: 14 (in the last three weeks.)

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Batman and Robin #2-4

To quote myself from Twitter: "The more I read of Batman and Robin, the more I think it's the best book DC is currently publishing." And to expand on that, it might even the best superhero comic across the industry. All of the characters, even Alfred who gets little play, are so well-rounded. What Peter Tomasi is doing with the Waynes is amazing; I literally do not know if Damian's character arc will lead him to redemption or Hell. And how Bruce reacts to that will shape Batman for a decade, much like Jason Todd's death did after "A Death in the Family." Coming out of it, he'll either be a happier, more stable man, or the fall of his son will crush him, sending him down a path darker than he's ever experienced.

I recently dropped all of the DCnU books I was reading, opting to wait for the trade -- even on Animal Man, Swamp Thing, and Green Lantern. With this one, though, I might continue to buy it monthly.

Comic books: 351.5

Trade paperbacks: 26

Graphic novels: 1

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Thunderbolts #100-143+oneshots and Deadpool 8,9-Oh boy. This is the definition of uneven. While I'm not the hugest fan of Warren Ellis these days, his run is the best of what devolves into a pissing match on who can make Harry Osborn crazier. The art is pretty consistently awesome. The writing is shaky throughout. It suffers a lot from being guided by editorial mandate and not what the story demands, which is kind of a microcosm of Marvel for the past few years. Unfortunate, really. The Cage era is a breath of fresh air compared to a lot of this stuff.

Comics: 1437

Trades: 40

Graphic Novels: 1

Omnibuses: 5

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The Ultimates, Vol. 2: Was kind of down on the story at first since it seemed needlessly long and the revelation about the aliens came the fuck out of nowhere, but the balls-out action of the last two issues made up for that, particularly with what Thor and the Hulk were doing (though I think the pages with Iron Man's big heroic moment were missing a few panels and Captain America's big retort to the guy he was fighting made me cringe).

52, Vol. 4: Somewhat mixed but mostly good conclusion for a series I was reading on and off, which probably is coloring my feelings about the series as a whole. I was most invested in the storylines revolving around Black Adam and the rest of the Marvel family, Steel vs. Luthor, Renee Montoya, The Question, and Batwoman, and Ralph Dibny, while I was generally couldn't give two shits about the ones revolving around Booster Gold and Skeets, the island of mad scientists, and Animal Man, Adam Strange, and Starfire being lost in space. I will say that the different art styles throughout the whole series complimented each other (though Robertson's issues I feel were over-inked) and J. G. Jones' covers were brilliant. Even though it's by no means a bad or even a middling book, I think this, along with the three previous volumes, will be among those I'll be donating to my local library next week.

Trades: 34

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Invaders Now: Part of a weird deal Marvel made with Dynamite a couple years ago that had Alex Ross come over and conceptualize a bunch of Invaders related minis (Avengers Invaders, Invaders Now, Torch, maybe others). I don't get it. I guess having a cover painted by Alex Ross sells books no matter what. Too bad the interiors never live up. This artist stinks. Caio something. The story is pretty lightweight for something by Christos Gage. Don't recommend.\

Avengers/Thunderbolts #1-6: Some parts good. Others bad. It explains away a few of the changes between Thunderbolts 75 and 100. It also has some great Barry Kitson art for the first few issues that is strangely changed halfway through to Tom Grummett, who, while I enjoyed his previous TBolts stuff, is made to look very subpar next to Kitson. And I'm not even a big Kitson fan.

Post of disappointmen thus far.

Green Lantern #3: Hi. You're awesome. Only DCnU book I'm continuing with.

Comics: 1444

Trades: 41

Graphic Novels: 1

Omnibuses: 5

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Phantom Zone #1-4: Always love to reread through some Gerber/Colan goodness!

Essential Tomb of Dracula vol. 1: I can't really say anymore than check out Dying in the Gutters, bitches.

Comics: 1448

Trades: 41

Graphic Novels: 1

Omnibuses: 6

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Green Lantern New Guardians #3: This one was a lot better than 2. I'm debating my stance on dropping this one now.

Green Lantern Corps #3: The same for this one, but I think it's because of big moments. I'm not sure if I'll drop both of these, but I probably will.

Red Lanterns #3: The first two issues were valiant efforts but it's pretty much run its course for me. I still don't know who these brothers with the dead grandfather are and I don't care. Bye bye.

Crack Comics #63 (Next Issue Project #3?): This is the best idea going in comics right now. Erik Larsen editing the "next" issue of a cancelled Golden Age book (complete with Golden Age size printing!) and modern guys do a fun GA tale. Brilliance! Just another reason why Erik Larsen is the fucking best.

Comics: 1452

Trades: 41

Graphic Novels: 1

Omnibuses: 6

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Finished Identity Crisis.

It is interesting, as it didn't bore me, but certain things were just off about it for me.

Maybe it is because my only exposure of the Justice League is with the animated series?

Anyway, I didn't hate it. There are a lot of things I liked about it. But I am just kind neutral on it, is what I think I am getting at.

I loved/hated the scene where Tim Drake's father dies. Loved it because of the staging between the characters and the present (actions/events occurring) dynamics. It felt like a really tight, well edited piece from a film or television show. Hated it because of what it does to the characters involved, and who was behind Tim's father dying.

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Metabarons 1-17: I will outright say that Alejandro Jodorowsky is a genius. His film and comic work has defined him as one of the world's most incredible storytelling minds. Juan Giminez is comics art's best kept secret and that's a damned shame. Unfortunately, this run reads much more like an epic poem or bible than it does a personal story concerned with character. It's fucking far out, that's for sure. But it is pretty impossible to connect with any of the characters. Still, a very pretty read.

Kobra: Resurrection-Stellar. I love what Trautmann's doing story-wise and it's always nice to see a Kirby oddity thrown in for shits and giggles. His first issue of Kobra was pretty bizarre, unfinished and terribly strung together by other artists aping him, but it's fun nonetheless.

JSA Vs. Kobra: DC really fucked up letting Trautmann get away from them. He would have been perfect for the DCnU as someone who shakes shitup and tells amazing adult stories inside of a superhero realm. This is great and solidifies why Mr. Terrific works. Don Kramer's art has never looked better either. The painted colors make it really textured and it's beautiful.

I'm inspired to read through Checkmate now.

Comics: 1469

Trades: 43

Graphic Novels: 1

Omnibuses: 6

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Checkmate #1-31: Superb. I adored this throughout. An underapppreciated gem from what I'm now considering the creative heyday of DC Comics. Excellent throughout. Which led me to read...

Great Ten #1-9: A really interesting look at a different culture of superheroes...ahem...super-functionaries with a light writing style. Bedard hit it out of the park in the writing but the art was a little uneven.

Invaders: Eve of Destruction-A collection of the only seven issues of Marvel Universe that I've been searching for for ages, not for the Invaders story (the first three issues) but for the Bloodstone/Dr. Druid monster-hunting team-up in the last four issues. It did not live up to my expectations. Still would have been interesting for Roger Stern to continue this series a little longer. Early Epting art is very different from his modern work.

Comics: 1509

Trades: 44

Graphic Novels: 1

Omnibuses: 6

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Ultimate Spider-Man, Vol.8: Cats and Kings

A very strong chapter in the Ultimate Spider-Man story. Best parts include Ben Urich's interview with the mayoral candidate, Aunt May laying into Jonah, Peter confronting M.J.'s douchebag father, and Jonah (sorta) reconciling with Peter. That said, I was a bit disappointed that it ended on a cliffhanger (though, admittedly, one that adds a new dimension to the villain). Also, Bendis seems to have forgotten that kids are off school in July and that this version of Jonah doesn't have a Hitler mustache (to clarify, May refers to Jonah's mustache as such, when Bagley's Jonah has one more like John Waters', so its an error in the writing and not the art).

Superboy: Smallville Attacks:

A collection of a few one-off tales contained within one overarching tale about Smallville. Bought this based solely on the praise Jeff Lemire was given from Mike among others on Earth-2.net: The Show and on the whole really enjoyed it, though the Reign of Doomsday tie-in felt out of place and most of the art in it is hard to follow. It's also said that the plot-thread with the superhero from the future will never be resolved thanks to the DCnU. Contains everything from (sort of) zombies, a Western-style flashback, the Red Mercy (a cousin of the Black Mercy), and best of all--PARASITE FROGS!!!

Trades: 36

Happy New Year!!!

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