XBox One news


JackFetch
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MS can only set the price of the games they publish, not everyone else's. A company already did this last generation. They made the NFL 2K games and sold them 10 bucks cheaper than EA sold Madden. They sold so many that EA paid millions for the exclusive NFL license and put the NFL 2K games out of business.

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That has nothing to do with digital and used correlation.

Publishers won't go down for the same reason Microsoft won't.

The fact that games occasionally coming out at a $40 price point is newsworthy kind of tells the whole story.

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That's been my biggest question, what happens next generation. Do your games become glorified paper weights? Unfortunately he didn't answer it.

The whole interview reminded me of the 80's guy from Futurama, "Don't you worry about blank, let me worry about blank."

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Considering how badly they want to be Steam, I'd imagine they'll have the same infrastructure in place when the console is no longer supported i.e. they'll flip a switch server-side and turn off the need for authentication.

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Because that's something people shouldn't even have to ask. They should have communicated their stance. It's not that obvious because they've made nothing obvious.

We're in an age where digital preservation is a valid concern, especially considering we still don't know what's going to happen when the 360 version of Live shuts down, and that's a console with a lot less reliance on connectivity.

Their problem isn't even the policies at this point, it's Microsoft's complete inability to communicate effectively or consistently.

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No console ever has turned off their games at the end of the console's life. Why would anyone start now? People are making up shit to be paranoid about because it's cool to trash Microsoft now. Why is nobody asking these stupid questions to Sony? Microsoft did some stupid shit, but that's not a reason to get stupid ourselves.

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Uh. No console has had the ability to turn off their games up to this point.

No one's asking these questions of Sony because they don't have the same policies and because they've been a lot better at communicating how games will work on their system. I think you're taking devil's advocate to the extreme here.

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This isn't exactly a question without precedent. There are single player mobile games that are lost in time because the games need to contact shut down servers to work. There are internet based games that basically just disappeared after they stopped being profitable. There’s never been anything on this level, but it’s a question worth asking; when the next generation ends and the general community have moved on, what incentive does Microsoft have to continue letting people access their games? It’s good publicity for sure, but there’s also the pressure to get people playing whatever comes next.

It’s all a long way away, and we have no idea how this generation is going to pan out, but I still think it’s a valid thing to think about.

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I found this interesting:
“Military personnel will be able to take their Xbox One and play their games with them without an issue as long as the game has been ‘activated’ once in the U.S. Your games go with you and play, no issues...”

Often times games are mailed to soldiers overseas; the soldiers don't bring their consoles and entire game libraries with them. This would mean that soldiers would need to, what, mail their Xboxes to the US, have someone put in a new game they wanted to play, activate it, then mail it back? Just so they could play a new game in their offtime?

Unless Microsoft changes their policies, it looks like the PS4 is going to be the console of choice for the military and people who travel often.

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I think the whole military aspect is being blown out of proportion. If you look at the numbers, in the last 12 years only 0.45% of the American population served during the Global War on Terror. That's a miniscule market that Microsoft isn't going to lose much money over.

Secondly, in my honest opinion, as a veteran of both Iraq and Afghanistan, if you're biggest concern while deployed is playing a video game, you should just shut up. You need to realize you're in the military and you have a job to do, and there will be plenty of time to play games when you get back to the states. You should be concerned about doing your job and ensuring you and the Marines, Sailors, Airmen, and Soldiers you deployed with make it home safe.

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They're removing all of the DRM.

Last week at E3, the excitement, creativity and future of our industry was on display for a global audience.
For us, the future comes in the form of Xbox One, a system designed to be the best place to play games this year and for many years to come. As is our heritage with Xbox, we designed a system that could take full advantage of advances in technology in order to deliver a breakthrough in game play and entertainment. We imagined a new set of benefits such as easier roaming, family sharing, and new ways to try and buy games. We believe in the benefits of a connected, digital future.
Since unveiling our plans for Xbox One, my team and I have heard directly from many of you, read your comments and listened to your feedback. I would like to take the opportunity today to thank you for your assistance in helping us to reshape the future of Xbox One.
You told us how much you loved the flexibility you have today with games delivered on disc. The ability to lend, share, and resell these games at your discretion is of incredible importance to you. Also important to you is the freedom to play offline, for any length of time, anywhere in the world.
So, today I am announcing the following changes to Xbox One and how you can play, share, lend, and resell your games exactly as you do today on Xbox 360. Here is what that means:
An internet connection will not be required to play offline Xbox One games After a one-time system set-up with a new Xbox One, you can play any disc based game without ever connecting online again. There is no 24 hour connection requirement and you can take your Xbox One anywhere you want and play your games, just like on Xbox 360.
Trade-in, lend, resell, gift, and rent disc based games just like you do today There will be no limitations to using and sharing games, it will work just as it does today on Xbox 360.
In addition to buying a disc from a retailer, you can also download games from Xbox Live on day of release. If you choose to download your games, you will be able to play them offline just like you do today. Xbox One games will be playable on any Xbox One console there will be no regional restrictions.
These changes will impact some of the scenarios we previously announced for Xbox One. The sharing of games will work as it does today, you will simply share the disc. Downloaded titles cannot be shared or resold. Also, similar to today, playing disc based games will require that the disc be in the tray.
We appreciate your passion, support and willingness to challenge the assumptions of digital licensing and connectivity. While we believe that the majority of people will play games online and access the cloud for both games and entertainment, we will give consumers the choice of both physical and digital content. We have listened and we have heard loud and clear from your feedback that you want the best of both worlds.
Thank you again for your candid feedback. Our team remains committed to listening, taking feedback and delivering a great product for you later this year.

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This happened much sooner than I suspected.
This is all the more ironic considering just how close we were to a future where BOTH systems had the DRM restrictions. Now neither do.
I don't think Microsoft's completely out of the water though. They're still at a higher price point and it remains to be seen if they can reign in their arrogance and communication issues. The complete 180 that they're pulling may actually do more to hurt public perception.
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There is going to be big fallout coming from this once Steve Ballmer gets off his ass and gets involved.

And that fallout is Don Mattrick leaving Microsoft in shame. He was about to get a raise and more autonomy as Microsoft is about to restructure giving it's department heads more control. Instead he might be running Zynga.

They need Peter Moore back.

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