Episode 189


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Dread Media is mad as hell, and it can't take this anymore. So Desmond and Darryll decide to break their dry streak and take in two theatrical features as they do Roadkill Reviews on Insidious and Hobo with a Shotgun. After some feedback, join him for a fitting tribute to, the master, Sidney Lumet who left us this week. Shotgun ditties: "Blood Red Sandman" by Lordi, "Shotgun Blues" by Guns N' Roses, and "Davidian" by Machine Head. [ 1:22:12 || 37.8 MB ]

The above is from: http://www.earth-2.net/podcasts/dreadmedia/episodes/dreadmedia_189.mp3

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What a fantastic episode of Dread Media. Aside from the two utterly awesome films reviewed, listeners also get interesting feedback, great music, and that Network clip rocked my soul.

This has to be one of Dread Media's finest hours. Great job, Des!

p.s. Thanks for editing my verbal fumblings, Des, and making me sound coherent :)

p.p.s. The other day I actually called the Avalon cinema in Nanaimo and thanked them for showing Hobo With A shotgun. Cheesy, I know, but I really wanted to encourage them to carry more underground and independent films like this and I told them so.

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Well, Preston, I am shocked and dismayed to learn that you are secretly Daredevil, Man Without Fear because only he could have sat through INSIDIOUS without getting the willies. What's to hate?

I liked it a lot more when it was Poltergeist.

It was just really, really derivative, Patrick Wilson mailed it in, and it relied way, way too much on jump scares, rather than tension and plot building. But hey, to each his own. It's rare I disagree with you and Des, but you're entitled to your opinion.

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Thanks, Preston. As are you and I totally hear what you're saying regarding the film's derivative nature. In the review I mention the "greatest hits" aspect but that never detracted from the film for me. I thought they borrowed tastefully from those classic films and they never went for the obvious steal.

In addition to that we get a pretty fresh looking demonic antagonist in Lipstick Face. He freaked me out.

And, yeah, there were a lot of jump scares but they were earned scares precisely because of the tension and plot building that props them up. You can't effectively have one without the other.

Lastly, and without going all spoiler-iffic, I'll just say I thought the ending was brave and fairly nihilistic for a mainstream, hollywood horror film. I really appreciated that.

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Lipstick Face looked like the bastard child of Darth Maul and Freddy to me, I didn't care for him either. The ending was satisfyingly nihilistic, but it felt like James Wan was going for a big M. Knight twist, because that's what horror films do now.

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Hah! OK, he was a little Darth Maul-ish but I wasn't thinking that during the picture.

His lair in the spirit world was awesome. It was as though, If we could have explored that space a little more, we could have discovered clues to the demon's previous lives. The horse, the puppets and dolls, the tools; All the trinkets and ephemera belonging to an entity still holding onto a long dead human existence. But he's not tragic. No, he is wholly evil and malevolent. As evil now in death as he most probably was in life. I dug him.

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His lair in the spirit world was awesome. It was as though, If we could have explored that space a little more, we could have discovered clues to the demon's previous lives. The horse, the puppets and dolls, the tools; All the trinkets and ephemera belonging to an entity still holding onto a long dead human existence. But he's not tragic. No, he is wholly evil and malevolent. As evil now in death as he most probably was in life.

This, I totally agree with.

There's the moment with the twin girls that was ripped right out of "The Shining." Now, I'm totally gay for that flick, but it seemed gratuitous to me.

insidious-film-darth-maul.jpg

ClintonDarthMaul.jpg

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Also, Preston, while I agree with you that Lipstick Face has a similar design (not the same but similar) to Darth Maul, I'm not sure why it's such an impediment for you. Is Maul the last word in red faced characters? Does any character with a red face immediately signal a Maul rip off for you? After all, Darth Maul did not have cloven hooves. From now on, though, if another movie features a character with hooves would you immediately dismiss it as a Lipstick Face rip off?

My point is this: Both character designs borrow liberally from pre and early christian imagery depicting devils and demons; the red face, forked tongue, pointed tail, horns, beastly hindquarters etc. Given those criteria and the context of the two films, I could argue that Lipstick is a more accurate and traditional representation of the old devil design while Maul is a watered down sci-fi cliche utilizing christian imagery in a context where it clearly doesn't fit. Or does it?

A similar example could be made of the Jedi robes in Star Wars. They are clearly ripping off traditional monk attire from earth. Or are they borrowing from historical, religious imagery that has become entrenched in the sub-conscious of western thought? Doesn't the very image of monks robes acts as a visual shorthand that encourages the audience to fill the image with associative sub-text that only helps the film in the end? Does this mean, then, that no film after Star Wars can utilize the image of monks robes? Of course not. You see, nothing is original and no single film has the market on certain designs or imagery. Especially when that imagery is mined from such commonly traditional sources, as both Darth Maul and Lipstick Face clearly are. Their design roots are so entangled that their similarities (and differences for that matter) become a moot point.

I'm just sayin'

p.s. Just so there is no misunderstanding, I post this in the spirit of lively debate, not as an attack on anyone's opinion. But I am right. ;)

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  • 2 months later...

Darryll, if you're not a fan of Troma films, how come you enjoy Hobo with a Shotgun so much? To me, this felt exactly like a Troma film. And I'm not saying that's a bad thing, but I would like to hear your thoughts about that.

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Well, yeah, it is a lot like a Troma film except way more clever and with twice the heart and soul exhibited in any Troma film I've seen. Plus, I've yet to see a Troma film that features any performance that could match the brilliance of Rutger Hauer as the titular Hobo. One of the best performances of the year but one that's sadly destined to be utterly overlooked.

So yeah, while HOBO certainly is reminiscent of Troma in it's depravity and certain aspects of it's style it's not nearly as empty headed as say, POULTRYGEIST, to pick an example. Troma is just so relentlessly lowbrow while HOBO has, at least, an aspiration for something more. Even if it is just mowing lawns until it gets back on it's feet. . .

Thanks for asking, by the way. :)

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And thank you for your explanation.

And I'm with you; I think Rutger Hauer should get some nominations for playing the hobo, but he never will because of the type of film it was.

Tomorrow I plan to listen back to this review, 'cause the first time I heard it I hadn't seen the film.

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While I enjoy our Roadkill Reviews immensely I have to admit they are not our most insightful. I'm usually driving during the review and I tend to fall back on gratuitous hyperbole when it's my turn to talk. Having said that, my opinion of HOBO W/ SHOTGUN has not changed one bit since that review was recorded.

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What's funny is that I recently re-watched MACHETE and it is nigh unwatchable now in comparison to HOBO W/ SHOTGUN. The level of quality in the storytelling and general filmatic excellence is just worlds apart. Sorry, Machete, you were fun while you lasted but your slick Hollywood facade just can't measure up to the double barreled Hobo justice.

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