Episode 356


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Listening now.

I fully support our soon to be overlord. All hail D.W.!

For the record, you can get fingerprints off a body for maybe an hour after death.

Regarding the ride in the car that never happened, you bring up Huey Lewis and the song you mention, in a movie made up almost entirely of flashbacks, is not "Back in Time"? For shame.

Spit-take on Reptile reading Maxim. Damn you, Dubs!

Awesome listen, gentlemen. I'm so glad I quit this series after the 3rd one.

Edited by The Other George W.
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Due to wonky audio, I was able to leave you saying that it's George Newbern, but I had to lose the part where you noted he played Superman in Justice League. Later in the review I come back to it when I call the character "Superman," but it might go over some heads because your portion was cut earlier. Sorry about that.

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We should have for next year a "help get Mike gin!" fund and when he ends up doing Saw 7

I meant to save the entire bottle of gin for the Saw VI recording, but I broke into it the night before. So less than half was left. Hence, my one (admittedly stiff) drink. Next time I'll save the whole bottle for the show.

By making a Patton Oswalt reference, Dubs won the episode.

By doing an awesome job summing up the plot, keeping us on track, being funny, and deftly inserting himself into the dynamic James and I already share, DW won the episode.

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As far as the fingerprint thing goes, you can get prints off of a dead body. Just the other day I was watching an old episode of The New Detectives about how forensic scientists do that very thing. It's done using fumes from evaporated rubber cement in an enclosed space. The enclosed space is created by draping a plastic tent over the body, usually at the crime scene, and the fumes are then created by burning a small portion of rubber cement on a small metal dish that has been set beside the body.

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As far as the fingerprint thing goes, you can get prints off of a dead body. Just the other day I was watching an old episode of The New Detectives about how forensic scientists do that very thing. It's done using fumes from evaporated rubber cement in an enclosed space. The enclosed space is created by draping a plastic tent over the body, usually at the crime scene, and the fumes are then created by burning a small portion of rubber cement on a small metal dish that has been set beside the body.

The thing about that is, the writer of Saw would just look at you, if you explained that and say "What? Sure, but can you make one person eat another cause he forgot to validate parking....."

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Regarding the ride in the car that never happened, you bring up Huey Lewis and the song you mention, in a movie made up almost entirely of flashbacks, is not "Back in Time"? For shame.

This actually ended up on the cutting room floor. There was singing and everything.

Thanks everyone. This was tons of fun and I'd love to do it again.

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I know Mike and I have another couple of E2: The Show collaborations coming up in December and January, Dubs. Because I know that when December rolls around, I'll have a 3-4-week period of a lot of spare time (what with school being out and all). You and I need to do the "Murder Set Pieces" Tranquil Tirades at some point next month. :blink:

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Saw is going to reach the point where they cash in with a pre/requel series, Saw: The Wonder Years or Saw Valley High or whatever. The Jigsaw School for Misguiding Twats run by the decomposing corpse of Jigsaw who conducts all his conversations through a vast library of video tapes his assistant puts up. Subjects taught? Engineering, investigation, kidnapping, video editing, arts and crafts (for the masks) and plot by Vince Russo.

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Okay, I will admit to loving to first three Saw movies, but I lost my taste for them during the third film. (Around this time I began losing my taste for graphically violent movies in general, so it really was not specific to the Saw franchise.) When I saw the first film and the identity of Jigsaw was revealed, I could only laugh and applaud. The reason for my doing so can be summed up in my knee jerk reaction to the first film, "My mythical-god, I just saw an American giallo movie." For me, Saw was not too far removed from the Italian genre films (lurid murder mysteries where style and graphic violence are more important than intelligent plotting or good acting) of Dario Argento, Lucio Fulci, and Mario* or Lamberto Bava. Dario Argento's Deep Red and Tenebre are my two favorite giallo films and both (and especially Tenebre) contain plot twists that are every bit as ludicrous as anything in the Saw films that I have seen.

*I was reluctant to put giallo master Mario Bava on the comparison list, because he is so much better than the other three, but his film Twitch of the Death Nerve was such an obvious influence on the Friday the 13th series, I have to include him for the historic perspective alone.

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As far as the fingerprint thing goes, you can get prints off of a dead body. Just the other day I was watching an old episode of The New Detectives about how forensic scientists do that very thing. It's done using fumes from evaporated rubber cement in an enclosed space. The enclosed space is created by draping a plastic tent over the body, usually at the crime scene, and the fumes are then created by burning a small portion of rubber cement on a small metal dish that has been set beside the body.

Now that you mention it, I think I've heard that before. In the movie, however, they were dusting for them, so my point stands.

Saw is going to reach the point where they cash in with a pre/requel series, Saw: The Wonder Years or Saw Valley High or whatever. The Jigsaw School for Misguiding Twats run by the decomposing corpse of Jigsaw who conducts all his conversations through a vast library of video tapes his assistant puts up. Subjects taught? Engineering, investigation, kidnapping, video editing, arts and crafts (for the masks) and plot by Vince Russo.

All joking aside, The Collectors was supposed to be a Saw prequel, but it wound up being its own film.

When I saw the first film and the identity of Jigsaw was revealed, I could only laugh and applaud. The reason for my doing so can be summed up in my knee jerk reaction to the first film, "My mythical-god, I just saw an American giallo movie."

Outside of the references Des has made to it on Dread Media, I know nothing about Giallo, so I really can't comment.

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From the perspective of being morally unrestrained, sure, there's some giallo there, but those movies don't spend half of their run-time telling you what just happened. The plot twist in Tenbrae (Tenebre? I can never get that right) was less reliant on the so-called brilliance of the main character than it was his dementia.

There is also a much larger focus on sexuality than you'd ever see in the Saw movies.

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